Youth Explorer goes national

Youth Explorer is an indispensible tool for youth-oriented municipalities, government departments and civil society organisations.

We’re excited to announce that Youth Explorer has graduated from the Western Cape and now has data on youth for the whole of South Africa.

Friday 16 June 2017 is Youth Day, a fitting day to expand this invaluable tool to the national level, giving unprecedented access to data and statistics on South Africans aged 15 to 24. Youth Explorer (youthexplorer.org.za) is a critical tool for anyone planning for or working with youth in South Africa.

With the help of UCT’s Poverty and Inequality Initiative we’ve broadened the scope of Youth Explorer to include national data on demographics, education, economic opportunities, family and living environment, poverty levels, and health and wellbeing.

“Youth-centred data at the small area - or community - level is scarce. Yet it is exactly at this level that programmes and policies need to be implemented. Too often provincial or municipal averages hide the stark differences that exist between communities.” – Emily Frame, Research Officer, Poverty and Inequality Initiative at the University of Cape Town.

The data, taken from the 2011 national census, provides deep insight into the issues facing South Africa’s youth, at the national, provincial, municipal and ward levels.

If you’re a youth-oriented municipality, government department, civil society organisation or in the private sector, Youth Explorer is an indispensible tool for policies, planning and decision-making.

How to use Youth Explorer

To get started, visit YouthExplorer.org.za and take a look at our series of explainer videos to help you get the most out of Youth Explorer.

We also have other videos that cover:

The story behind the data

Youth Explorer builds on the simplicity, power and familiarity of Wazimap.co.za to make the rich datasets around youth in South Africa approachable, understandable and useful.

Youth Explorer was developed in partnership with UCT’s Poverty and Inequality Initiative, Western Cape Government, City of Cape Town, Stats SA and OpenUp.

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